Wall Street Journal Review of New Albums by Glenn Branca and Dither Quartet

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THE WALL STREET JOURNAL “…It took a generation of composer-players who grew up comfortable with both classical forms and rock timbres—composers like Glenn Branca, Rhys Chatham, Tim Brady and Patrick Grant —to usher the electric guitar into the classical fold. Two releases—Mr. Branca’s “The Third Ascension” (Systems Neutralizers), and “Potential Differences” (New Focus) by the young guitar quartet Dither, both out now—offer an intriguing snapshot of new concert works for electric guitars.”

by Allan Kozinn

Read the complete review  HERE

NYU Awards Funding to Composer Patrick Grant for Tilted Axes Projects

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I am happy to find out that I received a 2019-2020 cash award from NYU Tisch School of the Arts. The award, from the Adjunct Professional Development Fund, is to further develop my work with mobile electric guitar ensembles in composition, performance, and public engagement. As a medium, the work will be used to address community concerns (i.e. the use of public spaces), global concerns (i.e. climate change and renewable energy), and future concerns (i.e. space exploration and unforeseen discoveries). Above all, it’s about creating music together and moving it out into the world. Thank you, NYU!Patrick Grant

#art #music #science #tiltedaxes
Tilted Axes: Music for Mobile Electric Guitars

Don Gillespie R.I.P. – A True Champion of New Music

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photo by Sabine Matthes

Don Gillespie R.I.P. (1936-2019) ~ I’m very saddened to learn of the passing of new music champion Don Gillespie. He was a friend. Don was Vice President of C.F. Peters music publishers when a very young me got a job there in the late 80s. He taught me so much about music, especially John Cage, Lou Harrison (he was good friends of both and introduced me to them), an expert on Delius, and my gateway to lesser known (to me at the time) composers like Nancarrow, John J. Becker, and Ruth Crawford Seeger.

I remember drunken music nights at his apartment where we’d have Busoni sight-reading contests (The Piano Concerto), debate the non-narrative structure of Robert Ashley‘s “Now Eleanor’s Idea“, and then he’d turn around and make us listen to a 1920s recording by The Skillet Lickers. The week that Lou Reed’s “New York” album came out, we listened to it at his place while eating the freshly smoked mozzarella he’d pick up for us from Joe’s Dairy on Sullivan Street. Let’s not even get started on his fascination with Sorabji!

Don and C.F. Peters’ Evelyn Hinrichsen were amongst the first supporters of my Silent Treatment concert series, my first productions, in the East Village back in 1989-90. He supported all kinds of new music up-and-comers, he connected many of us, young and old, near and far.

I would continue to see Don over the years either at concerts or get togethers at Margaret Leng Tan‘s house in Brooklyn for a performance of Lucier‘s Strawberry Fields Forever-inspiredNothing is Real.” I remember Don and his then wife Sabine coming over to gorge ourselves on caviar that I had just smuggled back from Russia and playing “Cage’s “Ophelia (1946)” on the piano for him on the 41st floor looking out over Central Park.

Don got really mad at me one time when, on the newly invented internet, I spoke for him (incorrectly) in an argument with Howard Stokar. He had every right to be really mad because I did something dumb. Something good came out of it. When asking him for forgiveness I was able to tell him how much he meant to me and everything I learned from him. We got back on track, but I wish I could tell him all over again.

The last time I saw Don I was playing a piece of music of mine on Cornelia Street in an ensemble that was celebrating Terry Riley’s “In C”‘s 50th anniversary. I saw him in the audience, he lived around the corner, and we just smiled. I haven’t seen him since, though I thought of him often. It was fitting.

When I think of all the hell he caught at C.F. Peters (it was an ugly scene back then for non-serialists; Don called it Fort Dodecaphonic) for supporting tonal, rhythmically innovative, non-European-inspired forms of new music, I’m glad he held his ground, and even put his job on the line a few times (truth), for the music he believed in.

So, seeing him there that sunny afternoon, with new compositions playing in the air inspired by “In C” to a diverse and interested crowd of New Yorkers, it felt like a victory for all of us who followed the musical pathways he showed to so many of us.

That fight’s over.

You won, Don.

Thank you.

Rest in Peace.

“John Cage at 100” by Don Gillespie
http://www.johncage2012.com/speakers/gillespie.html
“Don Gillespie New Music Box Profile”
https://nmbx.newmusicusa.org/new-music-advocate-don-gillespie-steps-down-at-c-f-peters/

Don’s middle name was Chance

“96 Tears” – Tracing the Roots of American Punk Back to Detroit

An American Icon on Public Radio International’s STUDIO 360

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“53 years ago this week, ‘96 Tears‘ by ? and The Mysterians rose to #1 on the pop charts. This week on Studio 360, the roots of American punk are traced back to Detroit in this brand new American Icons piece produced by Jocelyn Gonzales and Pedro Rafael Rosado, with Rob St. MaryRalph ValdezMary Cobra, New York Times’ Jon Pareles, and help from Patrick Grant and WDET 101.9FM.” (27 min.)

LISTEN: www.pri.org/stories/2019-10-24/american-icons-96-tears

2020: Tilted Axes Goes to Mars

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#NASA – “On a more cosmic note, Tilted Axes goes to Mars in 2020. Tilted Axes: Music for Mobile Electric Guitars has joined the roster of names that will be inscribed onto a silicon chip as part of the 2020 Mars rover mission. Engineers with the Microdevices Laboratory at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California will stencil all the names onto the chip with an electron beam. “This is part of a public engagement campaign to highlight missions involved with NASA’s journey from the Moon to Mars,” NASA officials wrote in a statement. Mars_Mission_Facts_600

The 2020 Mars rover is scheduled to launch to the Red Planet on July 2020 and land inside the 28-mile-wide (45 kilometers) Jezero Crater. The 2,300-lb. (1,040 kilograms) rover, with its nuclear power source, will search for signs of past microbial life, study the climate and geology of Mars, and collect samples that may be returned to Earth on a future mission”. #TiltedAxes #GoesToMars

tamars1C

For Your 2019 GRAMMY AWARDS® Consideration

“FIELDS AMAZE and other sTRANGE music”
by Tilted Axes creator Patrick Grant
new recordings from his classic catalog

* Contemporary Instrumental Album
* Instrumental Composition: “Keeping Still”
* Chamber Music / Small Ensemble Performance: “Imaginary Horror Film – Part 2″

The 62nd GRAMMY AWARDS® First Round Voting begins September 25th
Listen on Soundcloud: http://bit.ly/2n1Phue
More iNFO: http://bit.ly/2mtfemf

Cuming Co, Supercell

Alternative Nation: Grant Receives 3 Grammy Entries

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“Last year, Alternative Nation praised composer-guitarist Patrick Grant’s album, Fields Amaze and other sTRANGE music. And it turns out that the applause was indeed well deserved, as the album has three entries in the running for selection for the 62nd Grammy Awards taking place January 2020 – Best Contemporary Instrumental Album (for Fields Amaze), Best Instrumental Composition (for “Keeping Still”), and Best Chamber Music/Small Ensemble Performance (for “Imaginary Horror Film – Part 2″).

Described as ‘Unexpected rhythms, outside of the box instrumentation and a completely, uncompromising barrage of artistic individuality’ by Alt Nation’s Joe Hughes, several genres are touched upon concerning Grant’s original style/approach, which blends together instrumental, experimental/avant-garde, prog, jazz, and soundscapes…”

Read the complete article on Alternation Nation HERE: https://www.alternativenation.net/patrick-grant-fields-amaze-receives-three-grammy-entries/