A Tilted Tetralogy of Events

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The application for Tilted Axes: Concert of Colors, July 12-13 in Detroit, MI is open.

Here is the link to apply: https://forms.gle/QaUMZo7cQqNAmsqTA

The above application is for electric guitarists, electric bassists, percussionists and support crew to be a part of Tilted Axes: Music for Mobile Electric Guitars appearances at Metro Detroit’s 27th Annual Concert of Colors on July 12 and July 13.

On July 12th Tilted Axes performance highlight will be a musical procession around the cultural campus of The Michigan Science Center, The Charles H Wright Museum of African American History, The Detroit Institute of the Arts, and the Detroit Historical Society. The procession will take place approximately between 5:00-8:00pm

On July 13th Tilted Axes performance highlight will be two musical performances of “MOONWALK,” new music created for the 50th anniversary of the first crewed lunar landing along with other Tilted Axes repertoire. The performances will take place at 1:00pm and 3:00pm and encompass various points inside the museum with a visit to the planetarium as its centerpiece.

Participants are not required to be a part of the TILTED AXES: SPACE CAMP June 8-9 FREE workshops, but if you are new to the ensemble or wish to re-enforce your knowledge of the core repertoire and tilted techniques, it is not a bad to be a part of it if you are able. To apply, please go to this Google Form here: https://forms.gle/WaaFwJZthGFyqTFK7

Meanwhile, in New York City: Tilted Axes NYC has two peformances coming up in June:

Tilted Axes: Make Music Harlem (June 21) – This event is part of a block party on W 119 Street that’s being produced by Milica Paranosic’s organization Paracademia LLC. The event page is HERE. At 5:00pm we’ll be performing a procession to The Apollo Theater and back and will take the stage for a short set at 6:30pm.

Tilted Axes: Rubulad (June 29) – Rubulad is a community of artists, performers and entertainers based in Brooklyn, NY located at 389 Melrose Street. We begin ca. 9:00pm and will perform (perhaps) a foray into the nearby neighborhood, a procession through their garden, and a performance on and around their stage. Many other acts will be a part. It will be Pride Weekend all around, so expect a joyful scene.

For more details, maps, and information on how you can be a part of any these events, please go to our web page: http://tiltedaxes.com/tiltedaxes.html

All of our performances are given free to the public. These events would not be possible without our numerous co-producers and project donors. Won’t you consider making a tax deductible gift through our sponsor Fractured Atlas? Go to:

https://fundraising.fracturedatlas.org/tilted-axes-music-for-mobile-electric-guitars

Tilted Axes thanks the organizations, collaborators, and sponsors that hold everything together: Vox Amps, KORG USA, Midtown Detroit, Alchemical Studios NYC, Brooklyn Battery Works, DIME (Detroit Institute of Music Education), The Concert of Colors, The Michigan Science Center, Paracademia Inc. and Peppergreen Media.

Thank you all,
Patrick Grant & Tilted Axes: Music for Mobile Electric Guitars

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Meet the performers and crew of Tilted Axes NYC Summer 2019 
click link > http://tiltedaxes.com/NYCSummer2019_artists.html

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Left to right, top to bottom: Gene Ardor, Angela Babin, Aileen Bunch, Jon Clancy, Dan Cooper, David Demnitz, David Tamura, Patrick Grant, John Ferrari, John Halo, John Lovaas, Sarah Metivier Schadt, Jeremy Nesse, Chad Ossman, Kevin Pfieffer, Sean Satin, Harry Scott, Jocelyn Gonzales

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Concert of Colors Announces 2019 Lineup

CONCERT OF COLORS Press Conference at the DIA

Concert of Colors 2019 PDF brochurehttps://bit.ly/2H9cjFJ

CONCERT OF COLORS Press Conference May 9th at 11:30 am, Crystal Gallery at the DIA (Detroit Institute of Arts). Doors open at 11. Hear the lineup and news of this year’s world music festival!

The Detroit Free Press

“…The following seven days will bring a variety of performances and events, including a mobile electric-guitar procession by TILTED AXES and screenings of films such as “Grace Jones: Bloodlight and Bami” and “God Said Give ‘Em Drum Machines: The Story of Detroit Techno.”

Hour Detroit

“…Performers include Tilted Axes, a traveling guitar processional that will honor the 50th anniversary of the moon landing with a piece titled “Moonwalk;” Toby Foyeh and Orchestra Africa, a traditional Nigerian Yoruba music group; and Jordanian Palestinian electronic music group 47Soul.

On July 13, the festival will host the Detroit All-Star Revue concert. The concert is curated by successful Detroit producer Don Was, and it celebrates the 60th anniversary of Motown. Performers include Martha Reeves, Mitch Ryder, Carolyn Crawford, The Drinkard Sisters, Kenny Watson, and many more.”

Tilted Axes: MOONWALK at the Concert of Colors

T-Minus 10 weeks away …

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FRIDAY, JULY 12

The Michigan Science Center presents:

5020 John R St., Detroit, 48202

5-8 p.m. (Moving between Various Locations) TILTED AXES: MUSIC FOR MOBILE ELECTRIC GUITARS, created by Patrick Grant. Musical processions leading guests through the DIA (Detroit Institute of Arts), The Detroit Historical Society, + spaces in-between, ending at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History.

SATURDAY, JULY 13

The Michigan Science Center

5020 John R St., Detroit, 48202

1 & 3:30 p.m. TILTED AXES: MUSIC FOR MOBILE ELECTRIC GUITARS. Commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the first crewed lunar landing in 1969, “MOONWALK” by Patrick Grant. Performances around the center and in the planetarium.

The 27th Annual CONCERT OF COLORS

http://tiltedaxes.com/tiltedaxes.html

Tilted Axes: End of Year + Audio Gift

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Dear friends,

 As you consider your end-of-the-year giving, I hope that you’d consider supporting Tilted Axes: Music for Mobile Electric Guitars.  All donations are tax deductible. You know that’s a deal. My aim is to rehearse a new group of musicians and to create new shows to perform for the people of NYC and new locations around the USA to be announced. Here is the link…

Donate now!

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Part concert, part theater, and 100% live, of all of things I’ve created, this project has had the greatest resonance with any public it encounters. 

As a HOLIDAY GIFT, here’s a link to listen to “Tiltinnabulation” created for the winter solstice >>> https://bit.ly/2BDpyvK

Please become a part of our team for 2019!

As always,

-Patrick Grant

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Peppergreen Media & Tilted Axes: Music for Mobile Electric Guitars

web page: http://tiltedaxes.com/tiltedaxes.html

Here are some photos from our recent Winter Solstice events:

FLICKR – https://bit.ly/2LwsIG8

FACEBOOK – https://bit.ly/2SfIA2g

GETTY IMAGES – Make Music Winter 12/21 – https://bit.ly/2EKErR1

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Peppergreen Media

40 Waterside Plaza 12J

New York, NY 10010

http://www.peppergreenmedia.com

#tiltedaxes @tiltedaxes

FIELDS AMAZE (& other sTRANGE Music) 20th anniversary edition

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remixed + remastered + bonus tracks
coming soon

Press Release 7/21 update

Recorded at Philip Glass’ Looking Glass Studios and at sTUDIO 41 NYC.
Originally released on the sTRANGE Music label.

1. Keeping Still
extended percussion quintet

2. Fields Amaze
homemade gamelan and microtonal keyboard

3. A Visible Track of Turbulence 1
flute, clarinet, and piano 4-hands

4. Everything Distinct: Everything the Same
three keyboards in Gb just intonation and three percussion

5. A Visible Track of Turbulence 2
flute, clarinet, and piano 4-hands

6. Imaginary Horror Film 1
chamber prog ensemble

7. The Weights of Numbers
aka Fractured Fictions 
three keyboards and drums

8. Imaginary Horror Film 2
chamber prog ensemble

9. If One Should Happen to Fall
six words vs. thesaurus

“…a driving and rather harsh energy redolent of rock, as well as a clean sense of melodicism … the music’s momentum and intricate cross-rhythms rarely let up, making the occasional infectious tunes that emerge all the more beautiful for surprise.” – The Village Voice

Patrick Grant: piano, keyboards, electric guitars, gamelan, percussion – Kathleen Supove & Marija Ilic: keyboards – John Ferrari: drums & percussion – Barbara Benary: additional gamelan – David Simons: Balinese percussion & theremin – Keith Bonner: flute – Thomas P. Oberle: clarinet – Darryl Gregory: trombone – Martha Mooke: viola – Maxine Neumann: cello – Mark Steven Brooks: electric bass – Alexandra Montano: vocalise – Lisa Karrer: lead vocal on If One Should Happen to Fall.

Tracks 2, 3, 4, 5 recorded and edited at The Looking Glass Studios, NYC, 1997 – Garry Rindfuss: recording engineer – Dante DeSole: asst. engineer and editor – Ryoji Hata: asst. editor – Amanda Riesman: administration – gamelan instruments provided by Barbara Benary and Gamelan Son of Lion – large kendang drum and additional gongs provided by Skip LaPlante and Music for Homemade Instruments – originally released on the album Attack Decay Sustain Release by sTRANGE Music Records 1998 – Tracks 1, 6, 7, 8, 9 recorded at sTUDIO 41, NYC, 1998-2000 – Patrick Grant: recording engineer and editor – originally released as a Special Edition EP for the Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAMcafé Live) by sTRANGE Music Records, 2000.

All 2018 production, overdubs, revisions, and new stems recorded at Peppergreen Media, NYC and The Ferrari Factory, NJ. Mixed at Mercy Sound Studios, NYC – Garry Rindfuss: mixing engineer – Sheldon Steiger: album mastering – Patrick Grant: producer

All music © 1997-2018 Patrick Grant and published by Peppergreen Media (ASCAP). This album ℗ 2018. All rights reserved.

Cover photo Cuming Co. Supercell, June 14, 2013 taken by Dave Rebot and used with permission. Album artwork, layout, and design by Eric Iverson. Peppergreen Media logo by Steve Ball. CD image collage created from Elément bleu XII, 1967 by Jean Dubuffet, photo credit: sTRANGE Music Inc.

Thanks and acknowledgements: The Braunschweig Family, Coudert Brothers, Bank Julius Baer, Matthews Panariello P.C., Chris LaBarbiera, Patricia McKenna, Context Studios, Music Under Construction, Philip Glass, Kurt Munkacsi, Jed Distler & Composers Collaborative Inc., Music for Homemade Instruments, Erik Satie, Kyle Gann & The Village Voice, The Bang on a Can Marathon, Stéphane Martin and the musée du Quai Branly – Jacques Chirac, The Ross Institute, The Knitting Factory, Patrick Grant Group, I Wayan Lantir, STSI/ISI Denpasar, Gamelan Son of Lion, Celebrate Brooklyn!, Johnny Reinhard & The American Festival of Microtonal Music, The Fractal Music Lab, James Gleick author of Chaos: Making a New Science, The Margaret Jenkins Dance Company, The Brooklyn Academy of Music, Harvey Lichtenstein, The Mark Morris Dance Group, The Prix de Lausanne, Exploding Music, The Living Theatre, Kalvos & Damien’s New Music Bazaar, Annina Nosei Gallery, John Schaefer, WNYC’s New Sounds, Ralph Valdez, WDET Radio, James Moore & Independent Music Promotions Inc., Jocelyn Gonzales, The NYU Tisch School of the Arts, Roget’s Thesaurus.

Interview: Patrick Grant – Fireworks

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INTERVIEW – Fireworks Magazine (UK) interview with musician and producer Patrick Grant, creator of A Sequence of Waves (twelve stories and a dream) released on the Peppergreen Media label.

Patrick Grant is an American composer living and working in New York City. His works are a synthesis of classical, popular, and world musical styles that have found place in concert halls, film, theater, dance, and visual media over three continents. Over the last three decades, his music has moved from post-punk and classically bent post-minimal styles, through Balinese-inspired gamelan and microtonality, to ambient, electronic soundscapes involving many layers of acoustic and electronically amplified instruments. Throughout its evolution, his music has consistently contained a “…a driving and rather harsh energy redolent of rock, as well as a clean sense of melodicism…intricate cross-rhythms rarely let up…” Known as a producer and co-producer of live musical events, he has presented many concerts of his own and other composers, including a 2013 Guinness World Record-breaking performance of 175 electronic keyboards in NYC. He is the creator of International Strange Music Day (August 24) and the pioneer of the electric guitar procession Tilted Axes.

FM: The last time we spoke, you were talking about your Detroit origins in classical and rock music, your early avant-garde theatrical work in New York City, but mostly about your album Tilted Axes: Music for Mobile Electric Guitars. How was that?

PG: I could not have been happier with the response that album received. It was a crystallization of five years work, the end of a Phase One. If anyone is not familiar with the project, it began as a procession of electric guitars with portable amps for the winter solstice in 2011. It is part concert, part theater, and part street spectacle. Musically it encompassed everything from rock to classical to non-western, all written my me. It a way, it is a huge theme and variations. It became popular and we’ve performed versions on three continents so far. The album was a way of getting the music out to people and radio stations far beyond the scope of the live performances we did.

FM: What has Tilted Axes done since then?

PG: A couple months after the album came out, the USA was scheduled to have its presidential elections. The album was peaking in the press and we just finished performing for over a quarter of a million people in the NYC Village Halloween Parade. That’s a big thing here. Then we had the election and you-know-who won. That was highly unexpected. I was in shock for a number of weeks and it’s fair to say that a number of people are still in shock. I felt there was going to be a change in the coming year, maybe years. It was a good time to hit the brakes and re-evaluate. It seemed clear that the current models of professional music making were going to change and I wanted to stay ahead of that curve. I greatly reduced live performances so I could concentrate on recordings and took some formal training in film sound and associated disciplines. So, to answer your question: Tilted Axes has been on hiatus but will return in 2018. Currently, that’s the plan.

FM: What do you mean when you say “film sound and associated disciplines?”

PG: I needed to get current with my Pro-Tools skills. It is the industry standard for film and TV. My albums have been mostly Ableton, Reason, WAVES and other plug-ins up until now. My engineers were handling anything pro-Tools up until recently. They were better, faster, and has more experience. Then there’s dialogue recording and editing, sound design, ADR and Foley, as well as musical scoring. On top of all of that is the mixing and mastering for film and TV. It’s very different than music alone. Everything used is being used in service of a narrative, even if it’s abstract. It’s all about stories. Telling stories in sight and sound, even before language, could be argued to be the oldest art we have as human beings. Everything else is just detail and decoration.

FM: How has that affected your current work?

PG: I decided to do something concrete about it. Like a number of my avant-garde colleagues, I accepted a position at institute of higher learner. OK, I’m being funny. What I mean to say is that for two days of the academic week, at am a professor at the New York University Tisch School of the Arts Film School. NYU Tisch is pretty famous if those readers outside of the USA don’t know it. Its students include Martin Scorcese, Spike Lee, and a slew of others. It keeps me sharp and on top of the tech. I have studios and rehearsal rooms within which to experiment. The students are full of great ideas so I feel hopeful for the future of film, music, the arts. Really, I do.

FM: So that’s two days a week. What about the other five?

PG: Like I said, it’s been a time of re-evaluation. I’m pretty much the same writer, performer, and producer that I’ve always been. I’ve been consciously upping my game in the studio. I’ve been going back and forth between four projects and the first of these, a 13 track instrumental album, has been released, “A Sequence of Waves.” Its subtitle, (twelve stories and a dream), shows some influence of the film school. It’s also the title of an H. G. Wells short story collection, a connection I don’t mind at all. It feels like a pop album in duration and form. Many of the tracks have a verse, chorus, middle feel, even though I try to twist that around. The tracks themselves have a lot of variety in terms of style: prog rock, classical, blues, ambient, EDM, samba, cinematically inclined… there’s many cross-pollinated genres on it. It’s chamber prog! Supposedly no one listen to “albums” anymore, they just flick through playlists until they hear a track they like. However, there is a strong programmatic element as to the order of the tracks. It’s not just “a sequence of wave files.” [Dryly] Ha ha. That’s storytelling, plain and simple.

FM: What do you think are the standout tracks on the album?

PG: While we don’t really live in a time where there are “singles” as such any more, it could be argued that there are four singles on the album. The first would be “Seven Years at Sea.” On an album of instrumentals, it actually has vocals. It contains a 1930s field recording of three Creole sisters singing the ancient sea shanty “Sept ans sur mer.” I added piano, guitars, and other electronics to it. The end result is unintentionally Eno-esque.

The second of these four would be “Lonely Ride Coney Island.” It was originally created for a film but I recorded an album version here. I used every retro synth I have on it though it has real drums like all the other tracks. “Lonely Ride…” has turned out to be a hit in the EDM community. I wasn’t going for that but I’m happy that they picked up on it. Third would be “To Find a Form That Accommodates the Mess.” I’ve been saying that “every track has a story.” The story of this tracks actually begins with the one before it, “Prelude II”:

“Prelude II” began as an assignment from Robert Fripp. A few years ago at one of our Guitar Craft events, he pulled a number of us newer folks aside and said he had a “performance challenge” to give us. We all sat down and he pulled out The Hat.

The Hat is rumored to have once been worn by Bowie on one of his tours (Serious Moonlight?) and is now used in Guitar Craft to pull out names and numbers for random draws on slips of paper for such on-the-spot assignments. In this case Robert had written on little slips of paper words that designated quartets, trios, duos, and one solo. He pulled them out and assigned them to us at random. I was the lone soloist, a composer and performer who usually hides within layers of other guitars. That irony wasn’t lost on anybody. Robert swears to this day it wasn’t a set up. I believe him.

The challenge was that we had 24 hours to write a new piece of music and perform it in front of the larger group after dinner the following night. Being the lone soloist amongst the group, I announced the title of my piece as “Dude, Where’s My Band?” Robert laughed so hard. He himself calls it a Guitar Craft classic. That’s an honor of sorts. That’s how that piece was born. I renamed it “Prelude II” for the album, I multi-tracked it in places in the recording, but it is essentially a solo piece.

I liked its themes so much that I developed most of them further in “To Find a Form That Accommodates the Mess,” into which the original became the prelude. So, this new piece, “To Find a Form…” became this Post-Prog mini epic with a lot of orchestral textures. It also contains many elements from all the previous tracks. It’s a way of summarizing the experience of these twelve “stories.”

FM: And the fourth “single”?

PG: That would absolutely have to be “One Note Samba” by Antonio Carlos Jobim. By default it’s the “dream” on the album though, I like to say, any one of these tracks could be the dream depending on your perspective. The track began as a demo for a radio show here in NYC. I found a lot of sounds that I could render into the same pitch. It got played once on a Christmas special. I was invited to create a Tilted Axes performance in São Paulo, Brazil at the 3rd Música Estranha (Strange Music) Festival. I was able to record a number of found sounds there and incorporate them into the track with similar sounds found in NYC. I’ve always been a fan of original sounding covers whether it’s Joe Cocker doing The Beatle’s “With a Little Help From My Friends” or Devo doing The Rolling Stones’ “Satisfaction.” So these four tracks represent four different ports of entry into the album no matter what your main style of interest may be.

FM: Anything else to say about the other tracks or the album as a whole?

PG: It’s true that “every track has a story.” A quick run-down would be: “Lucid Intervals” began as a live looping piece but is now performed by orchestral instruments, the album contains a mini-suite called “Alcohol, Tobacco, & Firearms,” “Primary Blues” was created for the 100th anniversary of the first blues piece. There’s a few more tracks but that’s the gist of it. Like its predecessor “Tilted Axes,” this new album has somewhat of a mirrored sequence in the tracks. That is, track 1 mirrors track 13, track 2 mirrors track 12, and so on inwards with track 7 as a stand alone in the center. BTW that track is “Seven Years at Sea.” It’s no accident that it is in that position. All of this gives the work a sense of cohesion. Again: it’s storytelling.

I should speak more about the instrumentation. Those who know my work through “Tilted Axes” will hear more than the electric guitars, basses, and drums that make up that album. On “A Sequence of Waves” there is all that but there is also piano, organ, violin, viola, cello, synthesizers, percussion, and sampling. In a certain sense, it’s a more colorful album. I tried to reflect this in the album art and design.

I used the same production team as on the last album. Garry Rindfuss engineered much of the recording and was present for all the mixes. I rely on his ears a lot. Sheldon Steiger did the album mastering. He has a long list of credits working within a number of classical and popular styles. I think it’s because of this he is able to balance of the eclectic sets of tracks I give him.

FM: What are your interests outside of music?

PG: I’m interested in anything that can tell a story using non-verbal means. This includes all kinds of visual and graphic art, design, and architecture for example. A well-designed household item can speak volumes. This spills over into the realm of semiotics and this is a branch of philosophy I use a lot in our work. I’ve written a lot of music for modern dance and for experimental theater. That last one interests me a lot because it’s the only art form I can think of that contains all of my interests under one umbrella: every aspect of the visual, of music, of movement, of text, live performance, projection, and political commentary.

Another intentional aspect of the album was to suggest music that would be good for visuals. I am looking forward to creating music for film again. I have been away from it for a couple of years when Tilted Axes was at the center of my work. Now that I’m working with the NYU Film School, things are set up for that return.

FM: What’s in store for the future?

PG: I feel that I have put 2017 to good use and that I have a firmer foundation upon which to build. I’ve already spoke of a return to film scoring so there is that. There are also a number of recordings that need to be finalized for early 2018 release. One of these albums has members of the California Guitar Trio, King Crimson, and the Adrian Belew Power Trio on a number of its tracks. Also appearing will be my Tilted Axes and Guitar Craft regulars. You’ll also hear a lot more of my keyboard playing on future releases. Many people forget that keyboard were my main instrument for years. It’s time they should remember!

Tilted Axes will be making a return in a Phase Two sense. A tilt shift? I have partnered with a Canadian company that is making a new kind of portable amplification for electric guitars. It’s in prototype now and should begin production after the new year. We’ll begin working with these new amps in February.

One thing is for sure is that I have missed live performance a lot. Then again, I wouldn’t have this improved base of operation if I hadn’t put my attention toward other things for a while. Duty now for the future.

The next album’s working title is “The Velcro Variations,” because, after all, what is Velcro but hooks and loops? Yes, it’s hooks and loops.

December 2017

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